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The Stream Age

There’s been a fair bit in the mainstream press about retired NZF CEO Andy Martin’s attempts last year to ship the rights to the NZFC, NWL and Chatham Cup to a company whose specific aim would be to market them to betting companies. This, potentially, was a disaster waiting to happen in terms of the integrity of the league – with regards to potential corruption. $33,000,000 was bet on the NZFC last year via overseas markets, the sort of numbers which probably would pay to actually run all the teams that compete in it for a decade or more.

There’s been repeated calls for NZF to get with the century and allow clubs to stream games for a while now. The current Sky TV deal has meant clubs often don’t recieve equal airtime – often due to logistical and geographical challenges with regards to broadcasting, but also that clubs haven’t been able to use footage (beyond goals) for their own social media platforms.

That is about to change and for the better. ITBOTN has seen the final draft of NZ Football’s guidelines for what clubs can do with non-televised matches, elements of which we include below. It falls under three categories;

Clips

Participants may produce and transmit clips of singular-events in a non-Televised Match such as goals, big chances, subject to the following requirements:

  • Clips must begin and end by displaying the designated competition graphic;
  • Clips must be freely accessible to fans by being (but not limited to) linked or embedded on the clubs official website and/or other digital platforms.
  • Clips may be produced at any duration however it is highly-recommendation Clips are approximately 15 to 20 seconds in duration.
  • Clips, where possible, should display the appropriate information relating to the event. For example the score at the time of the event, the minute of the event, the name of the goal scorer. This is optional but highly-recommended.

 

Clips are great. They can show your winger absolutely rinsing a full back, one of your defenders making a Bobby Moore on Jairzinho style tackle, your keeper making a great save or any number of magnificent moments from a match. I mean it’ll also catch the horror challenges, hotly disputed penalty incidents and the other side of the game too. With a decent enough connections, you could cut and post first half clips on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook at half time.

The best thing about clips? They’re shareable. They’re short, so people will watch them. The more views, the more eyes on the league.

Highlights

1.2 Participants may edit, produce and transmit post-produced highlights of a non-Televised Match subject to the Highlights meeting the following requirements:

Production

Highlights must begin and end with the designated competition graphic for at least five seconds;

Highlights must be freely accessible to fans by being (but not limited to) linked or embedded on the clubs official website and/or other digital platforms.

Highlights may be produced at any length however it is highly-recommended that the highlights are no greater than 90 seconds in duration.

Highlights, where possible, should display the appropriate information relating to the event. For example the game clock, the score of the match, the name of the goal scorer. This is optional but highly-recommended.

Down to ten men, backs against the wall, but manage to hold on for a 0 – 0? That won’t get you much footage in the goalswrap, but it’ll be worth seeing for your fans. Hotly disputed penalty incident? Red card? Last minute winner, having been up against it? Shock victory? Clubs will be able to get highlights up on their social media themselves from now on.

It’s not new. For the first two years of the Sky deal there were Round by Round or individual match highlights packages. It’s just now the clubs will be responsible for recording, editing and publishing them.

Live-streaming

Participants may transmit in whole a non-Televised Match (live-stream) subject to the live-stream meeting the following requirements:

Production

Live-stream must begin and end with the designated competition graphic for at least five (5) seconds;

Live-stream must be freely accessible to fans by being (but not limited to) linked or embedded on the clubs official website and/or other digital platforms.

Live-stream must, for its duration, display a game clock, a scores tick including team logos and/or team abbreviations, and the competition logo water mark, such water mark must be displayed in the top right corner.

Now we’re talking. Particularly for the South Island teams, the opportunity to live stream non-televised games is pretty bloody good mate. Even title contenders like Team Wellington, who dabbled in a stream of their 6 – 6 semi-final against Waitakere United a few years back, may take this opportunity to present their home games from Dave Farrington Park (as they currently have none on the schedule for Sky TV).

Of course, there’s quality control for all these elements, and here it is;

Filming requirements

  • Live-stream must be filmed from halfway or within 10 metres of half-way;
  • Live-stream must be filmed from an elevated camera position of at least 3 meters (including tripod);
  • Live-stream must be filmed from a tripod with a high-definition video camera with at least 1080 horizontal lines of vertical resolution (1080p);

So, 1080p camera and a media box to run it into the computer. That said, there’s nothing there about not using the MyCujoo TV platform that was used by OFC for the U16 Championships from Honiara.

And finally, branding.

NZF shall produce Brand Guidelines which will contain a designated competition graphic for display at the beginning and end of any transmission and such graphic shall include;

Editable fields to display appropriate match information including match-week, team A v team B, and match date; and editable fields to allow for clubs to display their sponsor logos in addition to the competition sponsor (ISPS Handa) and Trillian Trust.

Understandable, and allows for some league recognition across all clips.

Looking at it, this is a huge step forward for the ISPS Handa Premiership clubs and raising the visibility of the league in New Zealand. The ability for clubs to create and distribute their own matchday content on their social media channels means more people sharing, liking and viewing content. It opens the league up to the sort of viral media events which reach beyond New Zealand and into the global football market.

The difference between allowing clubs this role in creating and distributing and the Andy Martin thing is quite clear – this isn’t aimed at the betting market. Dan Farrow and NZ Football are ensuring the integrity of the league with their education and processes for potential match fixing, but what remains an amateur competition will not be directly marketed for betting. This is about visibility.

It’s going to be an interesting summer.

Categories: NZ Men's National League

John Palethorpe

John Palethorpe lives in South Auckland which is very far away from Fratton Park and Champion Hill. Having been told there was no football in New Zealand, he was delighted to find that there is.

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